Empire of the Vampire by Jay Kristoff

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ St. Martin’s Press
  • Date ‏ : ‎ September 14, 2021
  • Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 752 pages
  • Author: Jay Kristoff
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SUMMARY:

From holy cup comes holy light;
The faithful hand sets world aright.
And in the Seven Martyrs’ sight,
Mere man shall end this endless night.

It has been twenty-seven long years since the last sunrise. For nearly three decades, vampires have waged war against humanity; building their eternal empire even as they tear down our own. Now, only a few tiny sparks of light endure in a sea of darkness.

Gabriel de León is a silversaint: a member of a holy brotherhood dedicated to defending realm and church from the creatures of the night. But even the Silver Order could not stem the tide once daylight failed us, and now, only Gabriel remains.

Imprisoned by the very monsters he vowed to destroy, the last silversaint is forced to tell his story. A story of legendary battles and forbidden love, of faith lost and friendships won, of the Wars of the Blood and the Forever King and the quest for humanity’s last remaining hope:

The Holy Grail.

REVIEW:
This book took me time to read because there so much was going on. It is not a fast read. I wanted to be sure what was going in the story. This is a very dark book. It’s not like “Twilight” or “Crave” or even like “From the Blood and Ash.” To me it’s a combination of Anne Rice vampire books along with “The Witcher” style. It’s calamitous how Jay spins the tale of Gabriel. This book is not for children.

There is fighting, darkness, swearing, death and blood and more. If this is not your genre, then don’t read it. I’m not giving it all away. If you have seen Jay Kristoff instagram or Twitter or the trending of the book itself, you know people have mentioned this. I don’t mind the dark side because it fits with the story and the atmosphere. I was captivated by the storyline. I wanted to know what was going to happen to Gabriel. I will admit some points in the story gave me a little discomfort.

For me it took a moment to understand that Gabriel is telling his story from two different points in his life. That’s how Gabriel wanted to tell it. So be on task if you read this book.

I could totally see the story in my head of what was happening, probably not exactly like how Jay writes it but it was there. Darkness, medieval feel atmosphere like fantasy wrapped around it and adventure of fighting. Gruesome vampires and other baddies! I kept seeing cliffs, cathedrals and forests along with death surrounding in some of the cities that Gabriel goes to. (I blame movies for these concepts and my love for old architecture). I saw certain themes from Gabriel’s telling of his story: family life, coping skills, anger, dealing with who he is (coming of age), what his purpose in life is and surviving. You may see some of that or not. (This I blame for taking a literature class back in my college days, it’s find to find quirks and themes in stories.)

The ending left me wanting to know if Gabriel is going to continue the damn story or will he do something naughty? So much happened in Gabriel’s life that I’m surprised he’s still going. What keeps him going? I want to know.

I will say this, the beginning of the story had me questioning how the hell did Gabriel get himself in that position to tell it? I hope Jay can keep track of his own story because it’s a lot going on.

I rarely read books that bring such sorrow and mischief. I will admit I have read Jay Kristoff’s “Nevernight” which was hard for me to read.

But I will say I do look forward to the next book.

Update Reading

Fall is coming….
The leaves are starting to change colors here.
Anyone else seeing that?

My reading has been up and down lately due to life! I have been getting some E-Arc’s on Netgalley and trying to keep up with that along with the library books that I have checked out. Plus my brain is thinking of one gazillion things….anyone else have this problem?

Perhaps I need to set up a schedule…hrmms…but sometimes doing that life throws you curveballs. I guess I’ll do the best I can. So here is the update of my world of reading.

Finished this E-Arc book….
I posted a review on it earlier. Go look.

Currently Reading….E-Arc Book
So far so good..
I am enjoying this but I need time to sit down to read.

Library books on my table eyeing me to read me at the same time!

Fiction Books

Check out these beauties!  I think Spoonbenders will be something I will snag up to read eventually.  The other books they may be read down the road!  Let me know which ones intrigue you.

Spoon

Author:  Daryl Gregory
Pages:  416
Publisher: Knof
June 27, 2017

Teddy Telemachus is a charming con man with a gift for sleight of hand and some shady underground associates. In need of cash, he tricks his way into a classified government study about telekinesis and its possible role in intelligence gathering. There he meets Maureen McKinnon, and it’s not just her piercing blue eyes that leave Teddy forever charmed, but her mind—Maureen is a genuine psychic of immense and mysterious power. After a whirlwind courtship, they marry, have three gifted children, and become the Amazing Telemachus Family, performing astounding feats across the country. Irene is a human lie detector. Frankie can move objects with his mind. And Buddy, the youngest, can see the future. Then one night tragedy leaves the family shattered.

Decades later, the Telemachuses are not so amazing. Irene is a single mom whose ear for truth makes it hard to hold down a job, much less hold together a relationship. Frankie’s in serious debt to his dad’s old mob associates. Buddy has completely withdrawn into himself and inexplicably begun digging a hole in the backyard. To make matters worse, the CIA has come knocking, looking to see if there’s any magic left in the Telemachus clan. And there is: Irene’s son Matty has just had his first out-of-body experience. But he hasn’t told anyone, even though his newfound talent might just be what his family needs to save themselves—if it doesn’t tear them apart in the process.

Harnessing the imaginative powers that have made him a master storyteller, Daryl Gregory delivers a stunning, laugh-out-loud new novel about a family of gifted dreamers and the invisible forces that bind us all.

 

Spoon1.jpg Author:Chloe Esposito
Series: Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know Trilogy
Hardcover: 352 pages
Publisher: Dutton (June 13, 2017)

Alvie Knightly is a trainwreck: aimless, haphazard, and pretty much constantly drunk. Alvie’s existence is made even more futile in contrast to that of her identical and perfect twin sister, Beth. Alvie lives on social media, eats kebabs for breakfast, and gets stopped at security when the sex toy in her carry-on starts buzzing. Beth is married to a hot, rich Italian, dotes on her beautiful baby boy, and has always been their mother’s favorite. The twins’ days of having anything in common besides their looks are long gone.

When Beth sends Alvie a first-class plane ticket to visit her in Italy, Alvie is reluctant to go. But when she gets fired from the job she hates and her flatmates kick her out on the streets, a luxury villa in glitzy Taormina suddenly sounds more appealing. Beth asks Alvie to swap places with her for just a few hours so she can go out unnoticed by her husband. Alvie jumps at the chance to take over her sister’s life–if only temporarily. But when the night ends with Beth dead at the bottom of the pool, Alvie realizes that this is her chance to change her life.

Alvie quickly discovers that living Beth’s life is harder than she thought. What was her sister hiding from her husband? And why did Beth invite her to Italy at all? As Alvie digs deeper, she uncovers Mafia connections, secret lovers, attractive hitmen, and one extremely corrupt priest, all of whom are starting to catch on to her charade. Now Alvie has to rely on all the skills that made her unemployable–a turned-to-11 sex drive, a love of guns, lying to her mother–if she wants to keep her million-dollar prize. She is uncensored, unhinged, and unforgettable.

 

Spoon2.jpg

The Salt House
by Lisa Duffy
Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Touchstone; First Edition edition (June 13, 2017)

In the tradition of Jodi Picoult and Lisa Genova, this gorgeously written, heartbreaking, yet hopeful debut set during a Maine summer traces the lives of a young family in the aftermath of tragedy.

In the coastal town of Alden, Maine, Hope and Jack Kelly have settled down to a life of wedded bliss. They have a beautiful family, a growing lobster business, and the Salt House—the dilapidated oceanfront cottage they’re renovating into their dream home. But tragedy strikes when their young daughter doesn’t wake up from her afternoon nap, taking her last breath without making a sound.

A year later, each member of the Kelly family navigates the world on their own private island of grief. Hope spends hours staring at her daughter’s ashes, unable to let go. Jack works to the point of exhaustion in an attempt to avoid his crumbling marriage. Their daughters, Jess and Kat, struggle to come to terms with the loss of their younger sister while watching their parents fall apart.

When Jack’s old rival, Ryland Finn, threatens his fishing territory, he ignites emotions that propel the Kelly family toward circumstances that will either tear them apart—or be the path to their family’s future.

Told in alternating voices, The Salt House is a layered, emotional portrait of marriage, family, friendship, and the complex intersections of love, grief, and hope.